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Powerful Pollinators

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Discover Powerful Pollinators

In the natural spaces around us, plants play a big part in the ecosystem. Humans depend on plants for oxygen, food, medicine, water, among many other things. It turns out that small creatures known as pollinators play a crucial role for the plants! What is a pollinator? Birds, bats, butterflies, moths, flies, beetles, wasps, small mammals, and most importantly, bees are all pollinators. A pollinator is anything that helps carry pollen flower to flower. The movement of pollen from the male parts of a flower (stamen) to the female parts of the same or another flower (stigma) is needed for a plant to produce fruits, seeds, and new plants. Pollinators like many species of bees intentionally collect pollen, while others such as many butterflies, birds, and bats move pollen accidentally while drinking flower nectar. Unfortunately, pollinators like bees are declining due to habitat loss, invasive species, parasites, pesticides, and more. The good news is that there is much that we can do to help pollinators around us. Check out the “Be a Pollinator Pal” resource above for ideas of what you can do to help the pollinators in your own backyard.

More Ways to Explore

Learn more about pollinators and what we can do to help them by checking out the US Forest Service Pollinators webpage.

*External links are provided for informational purposes only; they do not constitute an endorsement by LLPA nor is LLPA responsible for the accuracy, legality, or content of the external site.

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